Final Tier IV: You're Running Out of Time

You may not be aware of new EPA rules concerning Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines. One should acquaint themselves with the new rules which were announced on Tuesday January the 15th 2013 which includes final Tier 4 emissions. Below is a broad outline on what the rules mean and how they may concern you:

EPA Rules

The final revisions to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants will apply to you if you own or operate a reciprocal internal combustion engine for pumps and standby generators. The rules apply equally to gasoline and diesel engines.

Relevance

Existing fixed and stationary gas fired spark ignited engines. Remote/non remote existing fixed and stationary diesel compression ignited engines.

Monitoring emissions and emissions limits

Non remote engines requires replacing emission limits with an equipment standard for existing engines exceeding 500 Horse power at area sources. This will require HAP catalysts. Also an initial compliance test, an annual catalyst test. This will require fitting a high temperature shutdown or temperature monitoring device.

 

Please note those with existing compression engines over 300 Horse power, that have previously been certified to meet 3 tier engines and 2 tier engines over 560kW are in compliance with the new regulations providing they were installed prior to June 12th 2006.

 

Existing stationary Tier 1 and Tier 2 certified C1 engines at area sources of HAP which are subject State and other requirements, which need engine replacements, can meet existing practices up to January 1st 2015 or twelve years after the initial installation, whichever is later. However, not later than June 1st 2018. After this time the CO emission standards set in Table 2d may apply.

Compliance

Alternative compliance demonstration option, for stationary 4 cycle rich burn spark emission engines, are liable to a 76 percent or more formaldehyde reduction emission standard. Total Hydrocarbon emissions which have demonstrated to be 30 percent reduced.

Emergency Demand Response and Peak Shaving

There has been a change to allow use of of Remote engines up to 100 hours annually for monitoring and testing emergency operations. This includes voltage tests.

A limited allowance which expires on April, 2017 for stationary emergency engines at non remote locations, can used up to 50 hours per year for any non-emergency purposes. This might include peak shaving. The 50 hours is part of the 100 hours per year allowance for monitoring and testing. One should consult the new rules for other definitions and conditions.

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